The Sound The Universe Makes

As most know who have come to visit here at this Blog site, my fascination with the ways in which “sensationally” and internally one might look at the universe. So of course as long as the science is there in terms of how we are interpreting events. Then,  using the underlying mechanism of that interpretation,  so that it is universally applied,  then you get to see nature in different ways.

For example, in 1704 Sir Isaac Newton struggled to devise mathematical formulas to equate the vibrational frequency of sound waves with a corresponding wavelength of light. He failed to find his hoped-for translation algorithm, but the idea of correspondence took root, and the first practical application of it appears to be the clavecin oculaire, an instrument that played sound and light simultaneously. It was invented in 1725. Charles Darwin’s grandfather, Erasmus, achieved the same effect with a harpsichord and lanterns in 1790, although many others were built in the intervening years, on the same principle, where by a keyboard controlled mechanical shutters from behind which colored lights shne. By 1810 even Goethe was expounding correspondences between color and other senses in his book, Theory of Color. Pg 53, The Man Who Tasted Shapes, by Richard E. Cytowic, M.D.

As a reader,  you will also see if you look deeper into this blog the historical relation of humanity always seeking to define the way we can look at nature whether it is expressed musicianly or artistically. Is to identify this deep seated need to understand the cosmos in ways that we might not of considered.

5 types of ATLAS event shape data

The data is first processed using the vast and all-powerful ATLAS software framework. This allows raw data (streams of ones and zeroes) to be converted step-by-step into ‘objects’ such as silicon detector hits and energy deposits. We can reconstruct particles using these objects. The next step is to convert the information into a file containing two or three columns of numbers known as a “breakpoint file”. It can also be used as a “note list”. This kind of file can be read by compositional software such as the Composers Desktop Project (CDP) and Csound software used for this project. See: How is Data Converted into Sounds

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Janna Levin

I want to ask you all to consider for a second the very simple fact that, by far, most of what we know about the universe comes to us from light. We can stand on the Earth and look up at the night sky and see stars with our bare eyes. The Sun burns our peripheral vision, we see light reflected off the Moon, and in the time since Galileo pointed that rudimentary telescope at the celestial bodies, the known universe has come to us through light, across vast eras in cosmic history. And with all of our modern telescopes, we’ve been able to collect this stunning silent movie of the universe — these series of snapshots that go all the way back to the Big Bang.

And yet, the universe is not a silent movie, because the universe isn’t silent. I’d like to convince you that the universe has a soundtrack, and that soundtrack is played on space itself. Because space can wobble like a drum. It can ring out a kind of recording throughout the universe of some of the most dramatic events as they unfold. Now we’d like to be able to add to a kind glorious visual composition that we have of the universe a sonic composition. And while we’ve never heard the sounds from space, we really should, in the next few years, start to turn up the volume on what’s going on out there. See: Janna Levin: The sound the universe makes

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Radar echos from Titan’s surface

This recording was produced by converting into audible sounds some of the radar echoes received by Huygens during the last few kilometers of its descent onto Titan. As the probe approaches the ground, both the pitch and intensity increase. Scientists will use intensity of the echoes to speculate about the nature of the surface.

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Gravity is talking. LISA will listen.

The Cosmos sings with many strong gravitational voices, causing ripples in the fabric of space and time that carry the message of tremendous astronomical events: the rapid dances of closely orbiting stellar remnants, the mergers of massive black holes millions of times heavier than the Sun, the aftermath of the Big Bang. These ripples are the gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein’s 1915 general relativity; nearly one century later, it is now possible to detect them. Gravitational waves will give us an entirely new way to observe and understand the Universe, enhancing and complementing the insights of conventional astronomy.

See:What Does Gravity Sound Like?

       Gravitational Wave Detectors are Best Described as “Sounds.

See Also: LHC sound

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