Kilometric Radiation?

So we use physics in ways to change the way we see? Here are some examles from the Cassini Project and Wikipedia.

  • Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS)
    The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) is a direct sensing instrument that measures the energy and electrical charge of particles such as electrons and protons that the instrument encounters. CAPS will measure the molecules originating from Saturn’s ionosphere and also determine the configuration of Saturn’s magnetic field. CAPS will also investigate plasma in these areas as well as the solar wind within Saturn’s magnetosphere.[1]
  • Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA)

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) is a direct sensing instrument that measures the size, speed, and direction of tiny dust grains near Saturn. Some of these particles are orbiting Saturn, while others may come from other solar systems. The Cosmic Dust Analyzer onboard the Cassini orbiter is ultimately designed to help discover more about these mysterious particles, and significantly add to the knowledge of the materials in other celestial bodies and potentially more about the origins of the universe.[2]

  • Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS)

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) is a remote sensing instrument that measures the infrared light coming from an object (such as an atmosphere or moon surface) to learn more about its temperature and what it’s made of. Throughout the Cassini-Huygens mission, CIRS will measure infrared emissions from atmospheres, rings and surfaces in the vast Saturn system to determine their composition, temperatures and thermal properties. It will map the atmosphere of Saturn in three dimensions to determine temperature and pressure profiles with altitude, gas composition, and the distribution of aerosols and clouds. This instrument will also measure thermal characteristics and the composition of satellite surfaces and rings.[3]

  • Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS)

    The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) is a direct sensing instrument that analyzes charged particles (like protons and heavier ions) and neutral particles (like atoms) near Titan and Saturn to learn more about their atmospheres. INMS is intended also to measure the positive ion and neutral environments of Saturn’s icy satellites and rings.[4]

  • Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS)

    The Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) is a remote sensing instrument that captures images in visible light, and some in infrared and ultraviolet light. The ISS has a camera that can take a broad, wide-angle picture and a camera that can record small areas in fine detail. Scientists anticipate that Cassini scientists will be able to use ISS to return hundreds of thousands of images of Saturn and its rings and moons. ISS includes two cameras; a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC). Each uses a sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) as its detector. Each CCD consists of a 1,024 square array of pixels, 12 μm on a side. The camera’s system allows for many data collection modes, including on-chip data compression. Both cameras are fitted with spectral filters that rotate on a wheel—to view different bands within the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from 0.2 to 1.1 μm.[5]

  • Dual Technique Magnetometer (MAG)

    The Dual Technique Magnetometer (MAG) is a direct sensing instrument that measures the strength and direction of the magnetic field around Saturn. The magnetic fields are generated partly by the intensely hot molten core at Saturn’s center. Measuring the magnetic field is one of the ways to probe the core, even though it is far too hot and deep to actually visit. MAG’s goals are to develop a three-dimensional model of Saturn’s magnetosphere, as well as determine the magnetic state of Titan and its atmosphere, and the icy satellites and their role in the magnetosphere of Saturn.[6]

  • Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI)

    The Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) is both a direct and remote sensing instrument that produces images and other data about the particles trapped in Saturn’s huge magnetic field, or magnetosphere. This information will be used to study the overall configuration and dynamics of the magnetosphere and its interactions with the solar wind, Saturn’s atmosphere, Titan, rings, and icy satellites.[7]

  • Radio Detection and Ranging Instrument (RADAR)

    The Radio Detection and Ranging Instrument (RADAR) is a remote active and remote passive sensing instrument that will produce maps of Titan’s surface and measures the height of surface objects (like mountains and canyons) by bouncing radio signals off of Titan’s surface and timing their return. Radio waves can penetrate the thick veil of haze surrounding Titan. In addition to bouncing radio waves, the RADAR instrument will listen for radio waves that Saturn or its moons may be producing.[8]

  • Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument (RPWS)

    The Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument (RPWS) is a direct and remote sensing instrument that receives and measures the radio signals coming from Saturn, including the radio waves given off by the interaction of the solar wind with Saturn and Titan. The major functions of the RPWS are to measure the electric and magnetic wave fields in the interplanetary medium and planetary magnetospheres. The instrument will also determine the electron density and temperature near Titan and in some regions of Saturn’s magnetosphere. RPWS studies the configuration of Saturn’s magnetic field and its relationship to Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR), as well as monitoring and mapping Saturn’s ionosphere, plasma, and lightning from Saturn’s (and possibly Titan’s) atmosphere.[9]

  • Radio Science Subsystem (RSS)

    The Radio Science Subsystem (RSS) is a remote sensing instrument that uses radio antennas on Earth to observe the way radio signals from the spacecraft change as they are sent through objects, such as Titan’s atmosphere or Saturn’s rings, or even behind the sun. The RSS also studies the compositions, pressures and temperatures of atmospheres and ionospheres, radial structure and particle size distribution within rings, body and system masses and gravitational waves. The instrument uses the spacecraft X-band communication link as well as S-band downlink and Ka-band uplink and downlink.[10]

  • Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS)

    The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) is a remote sensing instrument that captures images of the ultraviolet light reflected off an object, such as the clouds of Saturn and/or its rings, to learn more about their structure and composition. Designed to measure ultraviolet light over wavelengths from 55.8 to 190 nm, this instrument is also a valuable tool to help determine the composition, distribution, aerosol particle content and temperatures of their atmospheres. This sensitive instrument is different from other types of spectrometers because it can take both spectral and spatial readings. It is particularly adept at determining the composition of gases. Spatial observations take a wide-by-narrow view, only one pixel tall and 60 pixels across. The spectral dimension is 1,024 pixels per spatial pixel. Additionally, it is capable of taking so many images that it can create movies to show the ways in which this material is moved around by other forces.[11]

  • Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS)

    The Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) is a remote sensing instrument that is actually made up of two cameras in one: one is used to measure visible wavelengths, the other infrared. VIMS captures images using visible and infrared light to learn more about the composition of moon surfaces, the rings, and the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan. VIMS also observes the sunlight and starlight that passes through the rings to learn more about ring structure. VIMS is designed to measure reflected and emitted radiation from atmospheres, rings and surfaces over wavelengths from 0.35 to 5.1 mm. It will also help determine the compositions, temperatures and structures of these objects. With VIMS, scientists also plan to perform long-term studies of cloud movement and morphology in the Saturn system, to determine the planet’s weather patterns.[12]

  • So how does String/M theory change the way we see?

    The calorimeter design for GLAST produces flashes of light that are used to determine how much energy is in each gamma-ray. A calorimeter (“calorie-meter”) is a device that measures the energy (heat: calor) of a particle when it is totally absorbed.

    Smolin added his contribution to the string theory discussion on the new Cosmicvariance.com site that has been created by a group of people that offer perspective. In this case Sean Carroll posted a thread on Two Cheers for String theory, provoked some iteresting responses by minds who are at the forefront of these conversations.

    I responded to this becuase I had been following both avenues Smolin spoke too, so I’ll put my comment here as well.

    This topic thread was develope from my reactions based on those who call people who are trying hard to integrate views of the natural world with the physics ideology of the topic of Strings?M theory, these fellows present. If they can not show us these new views as Smolin offers for inspection then what use the models and theories if no onne wants to se these work in the world we undrstand well by seeing around us?

    While some people are looking for consistant means of determinations, others apply “conceptual situations” and bring forth comprehension of a kind. Now to this degree, that “gluonic perception is being adjusted” to see these values. The Smolins and others understood well the limitation of these views? Are there any?

    Radio sounds from the source

    All of the structures we observe in Saturn’s radio spectrum are giving us clues about what might be going on in the source of the radio emissions above Saturn’s auroras,” said Dr. Bill Kurth, deputy principal investigator for the instrument. He is with the University of Iowa, Iowa City. Kurth made the discovery along with Principal Investigator Don Gurnett, a professor at the University. “We believe that the changing frequencies are related to tiny radio sources moving up and down along Saturn’s magnetic field lines.”

    Has Sound, Changed the way we See?

    Most of us understand the the aurora display do we not, and the resulting interactive play between the sun and the earth? The Auger experiment previously talked about and spoken too, by John Ellis, is a fine example of the diversity of interative features we can hope to see, as we examine the particle nature apart from the LHC rules of energy engagement, above and beyond the limits that have been imposed on us earthlings:)


    The Fly’s Eye and the Oh My God Particle

    While the topic is produced for this conversation seems disjointed, the ideology of the string theorist is held to a boundry of thinking in my eyes that such a membrane( here I could link a toy model for comparison), and defined in this bubble context, as rudimentry as it appears in my mind’s eye, it follows the developemental processes we see from the eulicidation Einstein offered us by joining Maxwell into the process unfolding in nature and to see the effect of any bulk production as a necessary step beyond the boudaries of this bubble?

    Now in contrast I see the soapy bubble and light refraction dispalyed in such a lovely continuous flow over it’s surface, that to me, it does not make sense if such auroric dispalyes are not to give us new ideas about the interactive feature of the sun with earth? Conceptually, thes ideas of hitting metal plates and such present new ideas in how dispersion across that plate could represent other ideas. What are those. Wel that’s what I am trying to do is free the mind from th econstraints we had put on it in sucha strick language accompany those that step ahead of us in their own specualtions educationally followed doctrine. What new light and thinking patterns follow these people?

    The auroral ionosphere is a natural emitter of radio waves, and many of these emissions are observable at ground level. Several types of radio emissions have been well documented using a variety of ground-based, stepped-frequency receivers (see reviews by LaBelle [1989] and LaBelle and Weatherwax, [1992]). In particular, auroral roar is a relatively narrowband emission at roughly 2 and 3 times the local electron cyclotron frequency ( ) [Kellogg and Monson, 1979; Kellogg and Monson, 1984; Weatherwax et al., 1993, 1995]. Much effort has been made in characterizing the seasonal, diurnal, and spectral characteristics of auroral roar to aid in determining its generation mechanism [e.g., Weatherwax et al., 1995.

    See also:

    http://www-pw.physics.uiowa.edu/plasma-wave/tutorial/examples.html

    News articles shamelessy borrowed:

  • Space Music
  • The Musical Sounds of Space
  • ‘Sun Rings’ Shares the Music of
    Space
  • Quartet, Choir Debut NASA’s ‘Space Music’
  • Out of This World
  • Music of the Stars
  • Music of the Spheres
  • NASA Music Out of This World
  • Sun Rings
  • Turning Sounds From Space Into a Symphony
  • Science and Music Merge for Fall Concert
  • UI Space Physicist’s Sounds of Space Inspire Work of Art
  • This entry was posted in Art, astronomy, astrophysics, Aurora, Cosmic Strings, Deep Play, Dimension, Earth, Einstein, Fly's Eye, Gamma, Glast, imagery, Imagery dimension, M Theory, Membrane, Mind Maps, Music, Oh My God Particle, Particles, Satellites, Smolin, Sound, String Theory, Sun, Titan, Toy Model and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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