An Artistic Valuation of Science

If I can’t call it science, then what shall I call it?:)


Yellow, Red, Blue by Wassily Kandinsky 1925; Oil on canvas, 127x200cm; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris

See:An Artistic Valuation of Science

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10 Responses to An Artistic Valuation of Science

  1. Phil Warnell says:

    Hi Plato,“If I can’t call it science, then what shall I call it?:)”I might suggest “Potential before it manifests”(seriously). That is for me is what true art has always represented in being.Best,Phil

  2. Plato says:

    See response here.

  3. Plato says:

    The Library: An Artistic Valuation of Science

  4. Phil Warnell says:

    Hi Plato,It’s just for me there are two things often looked upon commonly as being art. There are those that merely attempt to mimic reality and those others that rather attempt to interpret it. For me the mimickers do little to increase understanding, while the interpreters drive ever closer to the source. The source as I’ve always seen it forms from being potential and that is why for me this is what should be truly considered as being art. I would ask simply, what is the importance of da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, how skillfully she is rendered or the potential suggested behind the smile?Best,Phil P.S Just a correction to my first ham handed attempt:-)

  5. Plato says:

    Hi Phil,Here’s the thing. If you did not know how to use art to express certain things about our reality, then what use to speak about potential if it is not understood from just the painting itself? It represents the artist?Shall I place Mona LIsa’s picture on a trampoline for a purpose to help you realize the scope of the “artistic endeavour” not just I, but many others have been looking at?So one does some homework to find “information about the way we perceive things.” Learn to understand something about “the background” and how it materialized in the new adventure of the Library in terms of Information. The intermingling of the science in entanglement in this case asks what use it is to serve in computerization, that it could represent reality on many levels, and find an resulting configuration solidifying in the minds, with use of words of those who expressing things in much greater context then what we are used too, in our compartmentalization of the reality in which we live?Art Mirrors Physics Mirrors Art( please note that the original article has been supplanted by this new link not my intent but the progression to the book pointed out on the internet)The French mathematician Henri Poincaré provided inspiration for both Einstein and Picasso. Einstein read Poincaré’s Science and Hypothesis (French edition 1902, German translation 1904) and discussed it with his friends in Bern. He might also have read Poincaré’s 1898 article on the measurement of time, in which the synchronization of clocks was discussed–a topic of professional interest to Einstein as a patent examiner. Picasso learned about Science and Hypothesis indirectly through Maurice Princet, an insurance actuary who explained the new geometry to Picasso and his friends in Paris. At that time there was considerable popular fascination with the idea of a fourth spatial dimension, thought by some to be the home of spirits, conceived by others as an “astral plane” where one can see all sides of an object at once. The British novelist H. G. Wells caused a sensation with his book The Time Machine (1895, French translation in a popular magazine 1898-99), where the fourth dimension was time, not space.See:How the Natural World has Been PaintedBest,

  6. PlatoHagel says:

    Hi Phil,Here\’s the thing. If you did not know how to use art to express certain things about our reality, then what use to speak about potential if it is not understood from just the painting itself? It represents the artist?Shall I place Mona LIsa\’s picture on a trampoline for a purpose to help you realize the scope of the \”artistic endeavour\” not just I, but many others have been looking at?So one does some homework to find \”information about the way we perceive things.\” Learn to understand something about \”the background\” and how it materialized in the new adventure of the Library in terms of Information. The intermingling of the science in entanglement in this case asks what use it is to serve in computerization, that it could represent reality on many levels, and find an resulting configuration solidifying in the minds, with use of words of those who expressing things in much greater context then what we are used too, in our compartmentalization of the reality in which we live?Art Mirrors Physics Mirrors Art( please note that the original article has been supplanted by this new link not my intent but the progression to the book pointed out on the internet)The French mathematician Henri Poincaré provided inspiration for both Einstein and Picasso. Einstein read Poincaré\’s Science and Hypothesis (French edition 1902, German translation 1904) and discussed it with his friends in Bern. He might also have read Poincaré\’s 1898 article on the measurement of time, in which the synchronization of clocks was discussed–a topic of professional interest to Einstein as a patent examiner. Picasso learned about Science and Hypothesis indirectly through Maurice Princet, an insurance actuary who explained the new geometry to Picasso and his friends in Paris. At that time there was considerable popular fascination with the idea of a fourth spatial dimension, thought by some to be the home of spirits, conceived by others as an \”astral plane\” where one can see all sides of an object at once. The British novelist H. G. Wells caused a sensation with his book The Time Machine (1895, French translation in a popular magazine 1898-99), where the fourth dimension was time, not space.See:How the Natural World has Been PaintedBest,

  7. Phil Warnell says:

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  8. Phil Warnell says:

    Hi Plato,I’m not sure how we differ if at all in these matters and yet I promise to follow you progress in your attempt to explain. Although I to enjoy much of the work of Picasso I wouldn’t interpret it the same as you offered here. This painting you portray marks the birth of “cubism” which is more to express componentization of the objects of reality then the space they exist in. Later on Dali expressed through “surrealism” a similar concept yet in a way that included ordering as an aspect whose existence should not be trivialized yet rather emphasized. It’s not to say I prefer one over the other, it’s just to say that as with science it improves with time. That’s what I meant as it getting ever closer to the source.Best,Phil

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