Applying Color to the Real World

Spectra are complex because each spectrum holds a wide variety of information. For instance, there are many different mechanisms by which an object, like a star, can produce light – or using the technical term for light, electromagnetic radiation. Each of these mechanisms has a characteristic spectrum. Let’s look at a spectrum and examine each part of it. Introduction to Spectroscopy 

 
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Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI/CXC/SAO

This stunning false-color picture shows off the many sides of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, which is made up of images taken by three of NASA’s Great Observatories, using three different wavebands of light. Infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope are colored red; visible data from the Hubble Space Telescope are yellow; and X-ray data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory are green and blue. See: Image of the Day

Why might one suggest spectroscopy and it’s ramifications?

 While studying the question of how any of us may exist as emergent beings how might one find them self expressed as matter participants of this reality? What would have began first as to suggest that we used more then the typed neurons(stem cell) to shift the constructive nature of our constitutions as revealed in our DNA structure, as the forms in which we take? So there is already a pattern established in nature that we must look for?

What began as the motivation for expression as to insight that such energy is more then, is described as, is a continue change and expression of the evolutionary distribution of what we have become?

The crystalline state is the simplest known example of a quantum , a stable state of matter whose generic low-energy properties are determined by a higher organizing principle and nothing else. Robert Laughlin

What was that motivation then?

This image depicts the interaction of nine plane waves—expanding sets of ripples, like the waves you would see if you simultaneously dropped nine stones into a still pond. The pattern is called a quasicrystal because it has an ordered structure, but the structure never repeats exactly. The waves produced by dropping four or more stones into a pond always form a quasicrystal.

Because of the wavelike properties of matter at subatomic scales, this pattern could also be seen in the waveform that describes the location of an electron. Harvard physicist Eric Heller created this computer rendering and added color to make the pattern’s structure easier to see. See: What Is This? A Psychedelic Place Mat?

See: 59. Medieval Mosque Shows Amazing Math Discovery

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