The Journey For Natural Quasicrystals

“From future structural and kinematical studies of known quasicrystals, such as AlNiCo, these principles may be established providing a new understanding of and new control over the formation and structure of quasicrystals. See: A New Paradigm for the Structure of Quasicrystals 

Read an interesting article by: Natalie Wolchover June 13, 2014 in a Article called, “In a Grain, a Glimpse of the Cosmos.”  This article is located in the Quanta Magazine, by the Simons Foundation under the Physics section.

I really enjoyed the search for who supplied the original sample and from where. The journey back to the spot. Since following the subject of quasi-crystals for some time now, this journey was a nice addition to understanding the nature of matter in the early universe. This goes toward foundation, and my understanding of the work to piece together how nature sought to express itself materialistically from  Reflection_symmetry as a representation of that early universe. I might have to be corrected here.

 The concept of aperiodic crystal was coined by Erwin Schrödinger in another context with a somewhat different meaning. In his popular book What is life? in 1944, Schrödinger sought to explain how hereditary information is stored: molecules were deemed too small, amorphous solids were plainly chaotic, so it had to be a kind of crystal; as a periodic structure could not encode information, it had to be aperiodic. DNA was later discovered, and, although not crystalline, it possesses properties predicted by Schrödinger—it is a regular but aperiodic molecule. See Also, with regard to Shrodinger: A New Physics Theory of Life

Sir Roger Penrose’s adaptation here of  Penrose tiling is also of some interest to me as well.

A Penrose tiling (P3) using thick and thin rhombi. Note the aperiodic structure, shared by all Penrose tilings. This particular Penrose tiling exhibits exact five-fold symmetry.
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See Also:

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